Sunday, 26 February 2017

Hiking in the Hollyford Valley, Fiordland, NZ



I last walked the Hollyford Track with Dick and Laurel about 11 years ago.
We freedom walked which means that we carried all our gear and supplies and that we stayed at department of Conservation (DOC) huts.  We took 5 days to tramp from the road end to Martins Bay - along the Hollyford Valley into the Pyke Valley and along the Demon Trail(the most difficult tamping I had ever done) to Martins Bay DOC hut.

This time I am on a guided walk.
I looked at the weather forecast last week and I seized the opportunity to book a hike with the Ngai Tahu Hollyford Track guided walk.

Come, walk along the Hollyford Valley with me...

... and with our group of 15 walkers and two guides.

Something to smile about.



 Mt Madeline.

 Lunch stop beside the Hollyford River.
 Justin, one of our superb guides.
One of the aspects that set this hike apart for me was the occasional explanations along the way. Justin as a walking encyclopedia on on the botany, geology, human history of this region.
So interesting... nice for a breather, too.

Mt Tutoko in the Darran Range, the highest mountain in Fiordland.  2723m
Unexpected delicious hors d'oeuvres. 
A drinks list.
A Tuatara pale ale for me. 


Venison, Kumara and Potato mash, and vegetables  were followed by Lemon Pie.
A wonderful meal prepared by Anna and Sam at Pyke Lodge.
Delicious end to a 19.5km walk.

Definitely a well-earned meal.
Definitely something to smile about.
Definitely a wonderful end to a spectacular walk in the rain forest.




2 comments:

Joe Weiss said...

I thought about you the entire time you were on the hike, and was hoping you had good weather. Looks as if you did. Gorgeous pictures and the food looks amazing!! Venison???? Wow! How did your feet and legs hold up? I'm off to hike to Jack's Point, sounds measly after what you just did. Anne

Diana Hubbard said...

Anne, you would love the Hollyford Track.
There are so many amazing scenes around every corner. Being served such delicious food in the wilderness was a treat.